Forex Blog: Currency Trading News & Analysis.

Archive for August, 2008

Australia, New Zealand to Lower Rates

Aug. 29th 2008

I won’t lie; the Forex Blog is admittedly Dollar-centric, in that developments in forex markets are usually assessed relative to their projected impact on the US Dollar. Sometimes, we forget that their are other currency pairs that move irrespective of the Dollar. Take the Australian Dollar and New Zealand Kiwi, for example. As both currencies are backed by high interest rates, they have benefited equally from the carry trade and as a result, they behave quite similarly. Combined with the fact that they are practically neighbors, it’s easy to forget that there are unique circumstances that weigh separately on them.

Over the next 12 months, both countries’ Central Banks are expected to significantly lower their benchmark interest rates as a result of slowing economic growth. However, as New Zealand does not have a large stock of natural resources to depend on in times of economic turmoil, it is projected to lower rates quite sharply, compared to Australia. Accordingly, the Australian Dollar may represent a buying opportunity against the Kiwi in the near-term. Bloomberg News reports:

New Zealand’s dollar is likely to fall 8.7 percent to NZ$1.33 versus Australia’s by year-end as the nation’s economic slowdown accelerates, boosting prospects the RBNZ will lower borrowing costs…according to RBC Capital Markets.

Read More: Buy Australian Dollar Calls Versus New Zealand Dollar, RBC Says

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Decoupling Debunked

Aug. 28th 2008

When the credit crisis kicked off in 2007, many online forex traders and economic analysts quietly began to circulate the theory of "decoupling," which asserted the global economy was strong enough to weather a downturn in the US economy. In other words, it was expected that the credit crisis would be contained within the US, and the rest of the world would plod along, unaffected. This notion now appears to be completely without merit, except in a few isolated cases.

Instead, economies from Europe to Asia are sinking, and sinking fast. Some economies, namely Japan and Germany, have even begun to contract! Canada and Australia may slide into recession, regardless of what happens in commodity markets. Within this context, the Dollar’s 10% rally is not much of a mystery. In other words, this rally is probably more a function of economic weakness in other countries than of US economic strength. In addition, the end of de-coupling works both ways; a global economic downturn could further harm the US. A wave of negative economic data and/or the next round of debt write-downs could send the Dollar spiraling downwards. The Telegraph reports:

We are not witnessing a dollar rally so much as a collapse in European and commodity currencies. The race to the bottom has begun in earnest.

Read More: Dollar surge will not stop America feeling the effects of a global crunch

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Euro, Japanese Yen, Politics & Policy, US Dollar | No Comments »

An End to the Oil-Dollar Spiral?

Aug. 27th 2008

Over the last few years, the inverse relationship between the price of oil and the value of the US Dollar has been remarkable. As the Dollar has fallen to record lows, oil has risen to record highs. Now, with a massive Dollar rally underway, the price of oil has virtually collapsed. This relationship is understandable, since expensive oil contributes to the US trade deficit and crimps the economy, while the weaker Dollar, in turn, drives oil-producing countries to charge more in Dollar terms for their oil so that the price remains constant in absolute terms.

However, there are signs that this link may be coming to an end. Hedge funds, which are famous for spotting such trends and riding them to profitability, are winding down their long/short positions in currency and commodity prices because such strategies have evidently become unprofitable. Apparently, analysts and traders expect other fundamental factors to assume control over the price of oil and the Dollar. Namely, the still-unfolding credit crisis and the projected long-term supply/demand imbalance in energy markets will become more relevant. In short, don’t expect a further drop in the price of oil to necessarily help the Dollar, and vice versa.

Read More: Dollar-Oil Relationship In Doubt As Market Drivers Diverge

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Investing & Trading, US Dollar | No Comments »

Euro Hurt by Slowing Economy, Inflation

Aug. 26th 2008

The Euro has dropped almost 10% against the Dollar in a matter of mere weeks and everyone is wondering why. Setting aside the factors which favor the Dollar generally (irrespective of the Euro) because they were explored in previous posts, let’s instead examine those factors weighing specifically in the Euro. First, the recent decline in commodity prices is causing European inflation to abate. The Euro had previously derived significant support from the ECB’s hawkish stance towards fighting inflation. With lower prices, however, the need for further rate hikes may have evaporated. Second, the Euro-zone economy is looking increasingly fragile. Based on the most recent data, it actually contracted in the second quarter. Truth be told, the ECB hasn’t yet turned its attention from inflation to the economy, but if both prices and economic growth continue to slow, the Central Bank may be forced to loosen its monetary policy. In fact, the perceived inevitability of this fate may already be propelling traders to dump the Euro. Money and Markets reports:

While upping his concern for the euro economy, European Central Bank President Trichet has maintained his focus on rising prices. The latest predictions…however, point towards inflation having already peaked…

Read More: Dollar’s Rise Helps Level the Currency Playing Field 

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Central Banks, Euro | No Comments »

The Conspiracy of Intervention

Aug. 25th 2008

Yesterday, the Forex Blog published a commentary piece exploring the rally in the Dollar that is currently under way. While the rally is strongly grounded in fundamentals (falling commodity prices, the spread of the credit crisis to the rest of the world), some traders are nonetheless crying foul. They claim that the European Central Bank (with or without the assistance of the US) furtively intervened in forex markets to the tune of 10 Billion Euros. Even if their claim is true, it is unlikely to have meaningfully contributed to the Dollar rally, since the amount in question is quite small. Central Bank intervention would require an expenditure of at least $100 Billion to be even partially successful. Japan, for example, has spent nearly $1 Trillion (if its foreign exchange reserves are any indication) holding down the Yen over the last decade. Besides, the Dollar rally is unsurprising, given certain recent economic developments and the benefit of hindsight. Minyanville.com reports:

Whenever global liquidity tightens relatively speaking, it is very US$ supportive. Obviously, there are always time lags between economic events until the the market perceives them. So as a result of weak demand in the US, lower imports, the demand for oil declines, and that led to a tightening of global liquidity which led to the strong dollar

Read More: Currency Intervention and Other Conspiracies

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Investing & Trading, US Dollar | No Comments »

Commentary: Dollar Rally- Fact or Fiction?

Aug. 24th 2008

Over the last month, the Dollar has rallied tremendously, rising over 7% against its main adversary, the Euro. The price of gold, which serves as an inverse proxy for investor confidence in the USD, has fallen dramatically. As a result, many analysts have proclaimed that the Dollar has (permanently) bottomed out, and are busying themselves preparing projections for how high the Dollar will rise. But is the Dollar rally sustainable?

In the short-term, I would argue the answer is yes. The bubbles in the various sectors of commodity markets seem to have partially deflated, with oil and certain food staples well below the record highs they touched earlier in the year. As a result, inflation may soon begin to abate, and return to a comfortable level as early as 2009. More importantly, the US economy was among the first to be affected by the credit and real estate crises. Some analysts have argued that the worst developments have already come to pass. The crisis has since spread to the global economy, with other countries sharing in some of the burden. The result is that the US economic and monetary cycle is probably ahead of most of its peers. Accordingly, by the time the full impact of the crisis is felt by the rest of the world, the US should firmly be on the path to recovery. As other Central Banks move to ease their respective monetary policies, the Fed should be in a position to hike rates, providing further support for the Dollar.

As a result of this belief, US capital markets have received a sudden inflow of capital. This trend has been further buoyed by the notion that the US is the safest place to invest in times of crisis is gaining traction among investors. If the credit crisis continues to spread, this notion will no doubt be reinforced.

The long-term picture is of course more nuanced. The US will hardly emerge from the current crisis unscathed, and the ultimate cost of the credit crisis could exceed $1 Trillion. In addition, the US is unlikely to be shamed into changing its nasty habit of spending more than it saves. Accordingly, the twin deficits, those permanent thorns in the side of the Dollar, will probably persist. In addition, recent history suggests that investors are slow to absorb the lesson that There is No Such Thing as a Free Lunch. Despite the horrible collapse of the dot-com bubble, investors piled willy-nilly into the real estate market, with the result speaking for itself. Analysts are already speculating where the next bubble will occur; perhaps in alternative energy?

In conclusion, while the near-term prospects of the Dollar are surprisingly bright, the long-term prognosis is less so. There is no indication that the structural weaknesses in the US economy that led to the credit crisis and the multi-year decline in the USD that preceded it, will abate following its resolution. The future is inherently unpredictable, but I would expect the Dollar to continue declining once the global economy is back on track, perhaps in 2010.

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Commentary, US Dollar | No Comments »

Bernanke: Fed to Hold Rates Steady

Aug. 22nd 2008

In his headline remarks at the annual conference for members of America’s Federal Reserve Bank, Chairman Ben Bernanke reiterated his comfort with the current level of interest rates. He argued that while interest rates are certainly low by historical standards, a decline in inflation over the next few months should bridge the gap between the two. In addition, the credit crisis remains ongoing, and it is clear that Bernanke is more concerned about economic growth than inflation. Bernanke’s comments are supported by the recent Dollar rally and the simultaneous easing of commodity prices. At the same time, data indicate that over the last twelve months, prices have risen at the fastest pace in nearly 17 years. If futures contracts are any indication, investors basically accept Bernanke’s position, but not by much. Bloomberg News reports:

Traders added to bets that the Fed will increase borrowing costs by the end of the year, futures prices show. Odds of at least a quarter point boost in the main rate by the end of December rose to 32 percent from 18 percent yesterday.

Read More: Bernanke Says U.S. Inflation Should Slow Into 2009

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Central Banks | No Comments »

FXCM Introduces Micro Accounts

Aug. 21st 2008

Forex Capital Markets (FXCM) recently unveiled a new offering aimed specifically at retail forex traders interested in trading small lots of forex. The new type of account is appropriately termed "FXCM Micro," and can be funded with as little as $25. It will feature extremely tight spreads- as little as .015%- and automatic execution. By its own admission, FXCM is only able to offer such a competitive product because it maintains extremely low overhead and support costs. The product is quickly gaining notoriety, and 15,000 accounts have already been opened. Those wishing to dip their feet into the pool of forex without wetting their entire bodies should take note.

Read More: FXCM Micro

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Investing & Trading | No Comments »

Yuan Could Fall

Aug. 21st 2008

Almost all of the speculation surrounding the Chinese Yuan is aimed at predicting the point at which the currency will stop rising. Will it stop at 6.5? 6? 5? 1? But what if the currency has already peaked, at least temporarily? The Central Bank of China is now openly airing its concerns about a slowing economy, which it believes is more problematic than the country’s surging inflation rate. Accordingly, it will probably relax interest rates and slow the appreciation of the currency, in order to give businesses and exporters the leverage they need to keep the economy going. In fact, the Central Bank already announced a $50 Billion plan to prop up ailing capital and property markets. Such measures are likely to further stoke the fires of inflation, at a time when prices are already rising at the fastest pace in a decade. The futures markets have been quick to take note, and expectations for Yuan appreciation are falling accordingly. Bloomberg News reports:

[Futures contracts] suggest the yuan will reach 6.6060 per dollar in the next 12 months, an advance of 3.8 percent from the current exchange rate. Two weeks ago the contracts, predicted an advance of 5.3 percent. At the start of last month, they priced in a 6 percent rise.

Read More: Dollar Bottom Against Yuan Gets Louder in China Bet

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Chinese Yuan (RMB), Politics & Policy | No Comments »

Yuan Could Fall

Aug. 20th 2008

Almost all of the speculation surrounding the Chinese Yuan is aimed at predicting the point at which the currency will stop rising. Will it stop at 6.5? 6? 5? 1? But what if the currency has already peaked, at least temporarily? The Central Bank of China is now openly airing its concerns about a slowing economy, which it believes is more problematic than the country’s surging inflation rate. Accordingly, it will probably relax interest rates and slow the appreciation of the currency, in order to give businesses and exporters the leverage they need to keep the economy going. In fact, the Central Bank already announced a $50 Billion plan to prop up ailing capital and property markets. Such measures are likely to further stoke the fires of inflation, at a time when prices are already rising at the fastest pace in a decade. The futures markets have been quick to take note, and expectations for Yuan appreciation are falling accordingly. Bloomberg News reports:

[Futures contracts] suggest the yuan will reach 6.6060 per dollar in the next 12 months, an advance of 3.8 percent from the current exchange rate. Two weeks ago the contracts, predicted an advance of 5.3 percent. At the start of last month, they priced in a 6 percent rise.

Read More: Dollar Bottom Against Yuan Gets Louder in China Bet

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Chinese Yuan (RMB), Politics & Policy | No Comments »

Parity Party for the AUD

Aug. 18th 2008

Is the "parity party" on or off? That is the question on the minds of currency traders following the Australian Dollar. Last week, analysts indicated that the party had been postponed, if not cancelled entirely. This week, there are signs that perhaps some of the bearishness surrounding the AUD is overblown. To be sure, the Australian economy is slowing, and the Central Bank will almost certainly lower interest rates. At the same time, some analysts believe that commodity prices have fallen too far, and will recover in time, as the long-term fundamentals that have underlied their rise still remain in place. Besides, the currency’s losing streak is already the worst since 1980, which suggests investors have gone too far. The most likely scenario is a bumpy 2008 for the currency, followed by a strong 2009. News.com.au reports:

[One analyst] said a recovery in global commodity prices could give the currency a much-needed bounce over the next few months. Citigroup has also forecast that the global markets have turned "too bearish" on commodity prices.

Read More: Aussie dollar falls back to Earth

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Australian Dollar | No Comments »

USD Reclaims Dominance

Aug. 15th 2008

The USD is officially trending upwards, having appreciated over 7% against the Euro in only a few weeks. Of course, hindsight is 20/20, and some analysts now claim that support for the Dollar had been building for several months. They point out that the first break for the Greenback came in March when the Fed stopped lowering interest rates. Then, at a meeting of the G8 nations, several high-ranking officials indicated that they were unhappy with the recent decline of the Dollar and suggested that coordinated intervention should be effected in order to prevent a further collapse of confidence. While this "verbal intervention" was ultimately not backed by any kind of substantive action, investors apparently took the hint.

Further comments by America’s Federal Reserve Bank and the Secretary of the Treasury made clear that the US remained committed to the Strong Dollar Policy. A reprieve in the rise of commodity prices, followed by the proposed bailout of the two cornerstones of American’s sprawling mortgage industry, convinced currency traders that the world’s economic policymakers simply would now allow the Dollar to fall further. Lo and behold, the Dollar failed to break through a resistance level at $1.60/Euro (near a record low), and has since rallied sharply. The International Business Times reports:

It seems that that the big money had committed to a long Dollar, and was waiting for the economic slowdown to spread to the Euro Zone. Once the Euro Zone began to experience a slowdown, it just became a matter of time before the short positions that had been built for several months would pay off.

Read More: U.S. Dollar Takes Control of Forex Markets

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Euro, Investing & Trading, US Dollar | No Comments »

Inflation Drives Latin American Currencies

Aug. 14th 2008

While not yet in the same league as other popular emerging market currencies, the Brazilian Real and Mexican Peso are sure to join their ranks soon; both currencies have risen markedly over the last few years, and have performed especially well in the year-to-date. They have been propelled by interest rates that are generously high, especially compared to those of the US and EU. Brazil’s benchmark rate currently stands at 13%, while Mexico’s equivelent rate is slightly lower, at 8%. In fact, interest rates are quite high throughout the region, including in Peru and in Chile. Anlaysts expect most of these Central Banks will further tighten their leding rates because of surging inflation, which would provide further impetus to the upward marches of their respective currencies against the Dollar. Reuters reports:

"We see EMEA (European, Middle Eastern and African) central banks as reaching the end of their (monetary) tightening cycles, whereas there is still more to go from Latin America," wrote Barclays Capital.

Read More: Latam inflation eyed for currency impact

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Money Flows Back into US

Aug. 13th 2008

In historical periods of financial crisis, where did investors turn? The answer: the US. Some analysts thought that this logic would be turned on its head during the current credit crisis, since the reputation of the US as investing safe haven would surely be undermined by its role in the global economic slowdown. Over the last couple weeks, however, investors have returned en masse to US capital markets, sending US equities as well as the US Dollar to new highs. This has created a self-fulfilling cycle whereby a more valuable Dollar is driving commodity prices lower, which in turn, will benefit the US economy and drive the Dollar even higher. Perhaps the new logic is not so different from the old: that although it was the US that is primarily responsible for the credit crunch, it is also the US which is most likely to lead the global economy out of it. The Los Angeles Times reports:

Whether we come out of this first remains to be seen. But some grim economic data from Europe and Japan in recent weeks at least confirm that the slowdown has gone global. In that sense, the U.S. is the devil you know.

Read More: Homecoming time: Money pours back into U.S. markets

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Emerging Currencies, US Dollar | No Comments »

Analysts: Loonie to Fall

Aug. 12th 2008

The Canadian Dollar continues to lose its luster. Falling natural resource prices and the credit crunch have combined to exact a devastating blow on the Canadian economy, causing it to actually contract in the most recent month for which data is available. Now, the Central Bank is predicting that the economy will expand by only 1% in 2008. Most economists expect that Canadian Monetary Policy will soon lag US policy, especially if the Fed raises interest rates to combat inflation. Based on these developments, the consensus is that the Canadian Loonie is significantly overvalued, and will lose some of its value over the next few years, falling to a more sustainable level against the US Dollar. Bloomberg News reports:

The loonie will slide to C$1.05 by the end of December, and to C$1.09 by the start of 2010, according to the median estimate of 31 strategists surveyed by Bloomberg.

Read More: Loonie Loses Currency Wings as Canada Hurt by U.S.

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Canadian Dollar, Economic Indicators | No Comments »

China Adjusts Forex Rules

Aug. 11th 2008

As the Chinese Yuan has appreciated over the last three years, and even in the decade leading up to the sudden revaluation, a tremendous amount of speculative "hot money" poured into China. Periodically, the government and Central bank have attempted to stem some of these inflows by creating deliberately unfavorable conditions for foreigners to invest in China. Witness the unnaturally low interest rates and the one-way convertibility of the Chinese Yuan. Now, with inflation running at a 10-year high, the government is becoming more serious in its efforts to clamp down on some of the factors that are driving demand. As a result, it altered its system for governing forex and will increase its oversight over the entities and businesses that import capital into China. If executed properly, much of the upward pressure on prices, and the RMB itself, could be relieved. Reuters reports:

NEW RULES: China operates "a managed float exchange rate system based on supply and demand".

OLD RULES: China has "a single exchange rate system" with the central bank announcing the yuan’s value against major currencies on a daily basis.

Read More: China’s new forex rules

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Chinese Yuan (RMB), Politics & Policy | No Comments »

AUD: So Much for Parity

Aug. 8th 2008

The parallels between the Australian Dollar and the Canadian Dollar are remarkable! Both currencies are backed by economies highly dependent on natural resources. Both countries’ Central Banks are considering rate cuts in response to slowing growth. Finally, both currencies have slipped well below parity with the US Dollar. Unlike the Canadian Loonie, the AUD had never quite breached the mythical 1:1 level with the USD. Furthermore, given the deteriorating economic picture in Australia, parity is off the table for a long time.

Demand for Australia’s vast natural resources had begun to taper in response to rising prices, and now that prices have softened, exports are off even more. The Central Bank of Australia is indicating that it considers this drop in demand more of a threat than rising inflation. Accordingly, it will attempt to cushion the blow by lowering rates, perhaps as soon as next month. The Australian Dollar’s status as a beneficiary of the carry trade- because of the lofty 7.25% benchmark interest rate- may soon come to an end. Bloomberg News reports:

Investors have increased bets the central bank will cut borrowing costs. [It] will lower the benchmark rate by 91 basis points, or 0.91 percentage point, in the next 12 months, showed [one index].

Read More: Australia Signals First Rate Reduction in Seven Years

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Bumpy Road Ahead for Canadian Dollar

Aug. 7th 2008

2007 was a momentous year for the Canadian Loonie, which rose 17.5% and even reached parity against the US Dollar. 2008 has been somewhat less kind to the Loonie; it has been battered repeatedly from falling commodity prices and the global credit crunch. Actually, even before the price of oil peaked near $140, the link between the Canadian Dollar and natural resources had begun to break down. The rationale among investors had shifted such that expensive commodities were now seen as a drag on global economic growth, and hence, bad for Canada in the long-term. Using this logic, the currency should have received a reprieve from falling prices, but this was interpreted as bad for Canada in the short-term. In other words, a lose-lose situation. Perhaps, the Loonie climbed too high too fast, and a simple technical correction is in order. The Guardian reports:

The Canadian dollar has been stuck in a tight range since the end of last November. If the Canadian currency eventually closes below the low end of that range, it would be considered a sign of U.S. dollar bullishness and likely open the door to further losses.

Read More: Canadian dollar feels heat of economic slowdown

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Canadian Dollar, Economic Indicators | No Comments »

Euro Needs Better Governance

Aug. 6th 2008

Last week, the Forex Blog covered an IMF report that claimed the period of Dollar hegemony is nowhere near finished. This view appears to be widely held, and an American economist argued in a recent op-ed piece that the Euro still trails the Dollar in terms of global prominence. Certainly, he acknowledged the collapse in confidence that has sent the Dollar spiraling downward over the last few years. Central Banks are holding an ever-increasing portion of their reserves in alternative currencies, namely Euros. Many new bond and stock issues are denominated in Euros. But ultimately, the Dollar is still Numero Uno.

However, the potential exists for the Euro can one day catch up the Dollar, such that the world’s financial system would rest on two equal pillars. The key, argues the aforementioned economist, lies in better governance. The European Monetary Union lacks coherent leadership, preventing it from projecting power outside the EU and increasing the role of the Euro in the global economy. In addition, the process by which EU economic and monetary policy is determined lacks transparency. The current structure encourages members to act selfishly, and there is tremendous disagreement and controversy surrounding even minute issues. Until this system is reformed, the Euro cannot seriously hope to compete with the Dollar.

Read More: Reforms that would help euro punch its weight

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Euro, Politics & Policy | No Comments »

Zimbabwe Revalues Currency

Aug. 5th 2008

The exchange rate between Zimbabwe’s local currency and the US Dollar is currently 110 Billion:1, give or take a few zeroes. This complete collapse in confidence surrounding the currency is redolent of post-war Germany, when a wheelbarrow full of Deutsch Mark was required to buy a loaf of bread. The same hyperinflation, estimated at 100,000,000% on an annualized basis, has gripped Zimbabwe, causing prices to skyrocket and the local currency to plummet. As a result, the Central Bank has announced a plan to redenominate the currency by removing 10 zeroes from notes currently in circulation. Analysts agree, however, that this move is merely symbolic, and unless the Central Bank comes up with a comprehensive plan to fight inflation, they may have to repeat the re-denomination process later this year. Voice of America News reports:

Economist John Robertson agreed the zeros will soon be back on notes without a concerted effort to tackle the root causes of hyperinflation. Journalist Jonah Nyoni commented that what needs to be removed is not the zeroes from the currency but the leadership of the country.

Read More: Zimbabwe’s Central Bank Snips 10 Zeros In Currency Redenomination

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Exotic Currencies, Politics & Policy | 1 Comment »

New President Will Help Dollar

Aug. 4th 2008

By one measure, the US Dollar has lost 33.8% of its value under President George Bush, its worst performance by far under any one administration. The burgeoning twin deficits, lackluster economic performance, as well as the current environment of stagflation have all contributed to a dramatic and unprecedented loss of confidence in the Dollar. While investors are understandably optimistic about the prospect of a new President, come January, they are ambivalent as to whether it is Barack Obama or instead John McCain that is ultimately elected. Since the Dollar seems to have bottomed out anyway, the new President stands to preside over a recovery of the Dollar. Reuters reports:

"We look at the dollar as a brand and any change from Bush will help benefit the dollar."

Read More: Forex investors see new president helping dollar

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IMF: Dollar Remains Paramount

Aug. 1st 2008

In a recent report on the state of the Dollar, the International Monetary Fund (IMF) declared that the Dollar’s unprecedented period of dominance will not likely come to an end anytime soon. This assertion seems to sharply contradict the 25% depreciation (in trade-weighted terms) that has taken place since 2002. Moreover, many countries have liberalized their exchange rate regimes, such that they no longer need to maintain large stores of Dollar assets. The report’s conclusion draws strength from another period of sustained Dollar depreciation (which took place from 1985 and 1991), which was likewise not able to shake the currency loose from its moorings. The IMF does concede that Central Banks will probably continue to diversify their reserves in Euros, especially as EU capital markets continue to be seen as a stable alternative to those in the US. In the end, however, they see the Greenback is King. The Daily Monitor reports:

“Notwithstanding the dramatic claims by some, there is no doubt that the dollar will retain the central role, even though it may gradually share the stage with other currencies to a greater degree than at present."

Read More: US dollar to remain global currency

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Posted by Adam Kritzer | in Politics & Policy, US Dollar | No Comments »

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