Forex Blog: Currency Trading News & Analysis.

December 16th 2007

Central Banks Inject Liquidity

After months of delay and perhaps overly wishful thinking regarding the global credit crunch, the world’s Central Banks are finally ready to take action. America’s Federal Reserve Bank will join forces with the Bank of Canada, the Bank of England, the European Central Bank and the Swiss National Bank as part of a concerted effort to introduce greater liquidity into global capital markets.  Under the plan, the Banks will auction off tens of billions of Dollars worth of bonds denominated in their respective currencies, and lend the proceeds to commercial banks.  The goal of the plan is to to limit growing risk aversion, which has caused banks to significantly rein in lending.  Further, while the move is designed primarily to boost confidence in equity markets, certain sectors of forex may also receive a bump.  High-yielding currencies such as the New Zealand Kiwi and Australian Dollar, which have been shunned in recent months, seem to be the most likely beneficiaries.  Forbes reports:

"If the market is convinced that central banks are finally doing enough to ease the liquidity situation we are likely to see the funding currencies (the yen and the Swiss franc) fall back, and higher-risk currencies like the Aussie and Kiwi currencies, rally."

Read More: Dollar rises as Fed, other central banks move to shore up liquidity

SocialTwist Tell-a-Friend

Sponsored Offers

FREE Daily Email Updates

Enter your email address:

Delivered by FeedBurner

Have Questions? Want to Share Your Review?

Be heard. Please share your reviews today!

Neighboring Posts

© 2004 - 2018 Forex Blog.org. Currency charts © their sources. While we aim to analyze and try to forceast the forex markets, none of what we publish should be taken as personalized investment advice. Forex exchange rates depend on many factors like monetary policy, currency inflation, and geo-political risks that may not be forseen. Forex trading & investing involves a significant risk of loss.